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Snapping Hip

 
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kbird



Joined: 03 Oct 2016
Posts: 1
Location: Nova Scotia

PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:54 am    Post subject: Snapping Hip Reply with quote

Hello,

I am wondering if you may have some idea of an issue I've been having, and maybe you would be able to direct me to the proper Asana.
I enjoy practicing Yoga as well as Martial arts. I have found that sometimes my front right hip will make somewhat of a snap sound when I lift my knee up in the air and bring it back down, It does the same when kicking my right leg straight vertically and moving it in a circular direction to the right and down. Over time if I'm consistent with this kick the muscle or ligament gets sore and I need to stop.
I am looking to find the proper stretch to add to my routine in order to remedy this issue. I love your videos im just not sure of which ones might help.
Thank you for your time.

Respectfully;

Kris C

Namaste.
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Bernie



Joined: 23 Sep 2006
Posts: 1005
Location: Vancouver

PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kris. As I have written elsewhere (check out this page from YinSights) there are lots of urban myths about the cause of cracks and pops, but usually there are only three causes: fixation, friction, or a release of gas. I suspect (and that is all I can do without testing you) that you are experiencing friction. It is like when we snap our fingers: the pressure builds up between the thumb and the finger and then when it releases, the striking of the thumb on the palm creates a snap. I too get a snapping feeling/sound, but in my lower pelvis, when I make some leg lifting motions. What I believe is happening in my case is bone spurs! Over the years, when we constantly rub one area of a bone, it thickens (out of self-preservation). This thickening, technically called an osteophyte or bone spur, can create an uneven surface or bump which can catch tendons and ligaments. As the tendon tries to slide over what used to be a nice smooth surface, it can temporarily get caught up, but as the stress increases it eventually releases, with that snapping sound. For me it is more like a click.

I believe, in my case, that my psoas and/or iliacus tendon is getting caught on the pubic symphysis, gets hung up for a bit and then clicks as it releases. I can avoid this if I move my leg out a bit (abduction) before lifting it up. You may find that certain movement patterns will avoid the snap for you as well. You will have to experiment to find out what movement patterns work for you: try a bit of internal rotation with flexion; if that doesnt work, try wider abductionplay around.

If my speculation is correct, stretching wont help you, but retraining how you move might.

Good luck!
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YuangYoga



Joined: 04 May 2017
Posts: 12
Location: The right place

PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yea I've heard many times that cracks and pops are actually 100% ok and a normal occurrence in the body. Took me a while and a few people telling me to really believe it though! haha
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