Fascia has receptors for hormones and cannabinoids

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Bernie
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Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 2:25 am
Location: Vancouver

Fascia has receptors for hormones and cannabinoids

Post by Bernie »

See the work of Catarina Fede and her research paper Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue. It shows that fascia has receptors for estrogen and relaxin. So, in the time around ovulation, women may be more flexible than normal. Maybe this is a time to not try to go for maximum flexibility?

Abstract
Many epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental findings point to sex differences in myofascial pain in view of the fact that adult women tend to have more myofascial problems with respect to men. It is possible that one of the stimuli to sensitization of fascial nociceptors could come from hormonal factors such as estrogen and relaxin, that are involved in extracellular matrix and collagen remodeling and thus contribute to functions of myofascial tissue. Immunohistochemical and molecular investigations (real-time PCR analysis) of relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) localization were carried out on samples of human fascia collected from 8 volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery (all females, between 42 and 70 yrs, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups), and in fibroblasts isolated from deep fascia, to examine both protein and RNA expression levels. We can assume that the two sex hormone receptors analyzed are expressed in all the human fascial districts examined and in fascial fibroblasts culture cells, to a lesser degree in the post-menopausal with respect to the pre-menopausal women. Hormone receptor expression was concentrated in the fibroblasts, and RXFP1 was also evident in blood vessels and nerves. Our results are the first demonstrating that the fibroblasts located within different districts of the muscular fasciae express sex hormone receptors and can help to explain the link between hormonal factors and myofascial pain. It is known, in fact, that estrogen and relaxin play a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities, both important factors affecting fascial stiffness and sensitization of fascial nociceptors.

Also her paper on Sensitivity of the Fasciae to the Endocannabinoid System: Production of Hyaluronan-Rich Vesicles and Potential Peripheral Effects of Cannabinoids in Fascial Tissue. It shows that our fascia can respond to endocannabinoids.

Abstract
The demonstrated expression of endocannabinoid receptors in myofascial tissue suggested the role of fascia as a source and modulator of pain. Fibroblasts can modulate the production of the various components of the extracellular matrix, according to type of stimuli: physical, mechanical, hormonal, and pharmacological. In this work, fascial fibroblasts were isolated from small samples of human fascia lata of the thigh, collected from three volunteer patients (two men, one woman) during orthopedic surgery. This text demonstrates for the first time that the agonist of cannabinoid receptor 2, HU-308, can lead to in vitro production of hyaluronan-rich vesicles only 3–4 h after treatment, being rapidly released into the extracellular environment. We demonstrated that these vesicles are rich in hyaluronan after Alcian blue and Toluidine blue stainings, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, incubation with the antagonist AM630 blocked vesicles production by cells, confirming that release of hyaluronan is a cannabinoid-mediated effect. These results may show how fascial cells respond to the endocannabinoid system by regulating and remodeling the formation of the extracellular matrix. This is a first step in our understanding of how therapeutic applications of cannabinoids to treat pain may also have a peripheral effect, altering the biosynthesis of the extracellular matrix in fasciae and, consequently, remodeling the tissue and its properties.
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